Tundra V6 hybrid, Ram V8 hybrid no alternators? How would dual batteries work then?

mulebarn

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Hey folks,

I’m trying to do some planning around an upcoming half ton truck purchase for towing a Kimberley Kamper, and I’m wondering about new half tons like the hybrid Tundra and the Ram 1500 w/the Hemi eTorque. As I understand it, they don’t have alternators. What does this mean in terms of adding a Redarc BCDC charger/isolator and an auxiliary battery? Would you still simply wire the BCDC to the crank battery, and likewise to the second battery like I have in my 200 Series?

I can’t find a single example online of someone adding an aux battery to either of these trucks, which makes me think there’s a fundamental issue that I don’t currently understand. :)

Thanks,
Gino
 

mulebarn

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I just got this info back from Redarc.

In vehicles such as this, they are starting to use a DC-DC convertor to charge a ‘Starting/Crank’ battery and also power the electronics in the truck, so yes correct they do not always use a traditional alternator setup.

The main thing that the BCDC1225D would require is a source that can provide a solid 25A+ (ideally up to 36A approx.) for its input side; so basically as long as the DC-DC convertor can provide this plus more it should work perfectly fine with the BCDC.

Another thing to confirm as well would be the voltage that said convertor provides to the system; BCDC requires between 9-32V to come on and charge, so if it can provide almost a normal 13-14V feed to the unit this will be appropriate too. We will also need an Ignition feed to the Blue wire on the unit; this will be a source that has constant 12V on it when the engine is running and then goes down to 0V when it is turned off.

You may need to get some information to clarify those points from RAM or Toyota to be fair and even ask them about the suitability of setting up a Dual Battery system too. We wouldn’t want to go against their recommendations!
 

J1000

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They are hybrid trucks, presumably they have a battery pack many times larger than any 2nd lead-acid battery you would want to install. They use a DC-DC converter to convert from the high voltage down to 12v. Instead of adding a 2nd battery like a caveman, you should be able to use the hybrid battery as an auxiliary power source. The F150 hybrid has inverters and shore power available from it's hybrid battery, I would guess the Toyota and Ram would too.
 

Stuckinthe80s

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I was so lost on the concept of no alternator so I had to look it up:

1664287649141.png


I guess I never thought about it before but it makes a lot of sense. I'm going to assume the generator puts out a TON more juice than any alternator could.
 

mulebarn

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They are hybrid trucks, presumably they have a battery pack many times larger than any 2nd lead-acid battery you would want to install. They use a DC-DC converter to convert from the high voltage down to 12v. Instead of adding a 2nd battery like a caveman, you should be able to use the hybrid battery as an auxiliary power source. The F150 hybrid has inverters and shore power available from it's hybrid battery, I would guess the Toyota and Ram would too.
You should be able to, but in combing Ram and Jeep (egads!) forums, I’ve yet to find evidence of anyone actually being able to do so. My Google-fu is pretty good, but I’m stumped, so far.

Yesterday i also called High Country Performance 4x4 and Mule Expedition Outfitters just to see how they do it for customer builds. Both of them said they’ve never done electrical work on these hybrid truck systems!
 

RayRay27

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Jun 26, 2015
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Thornton via Boulder
Hey folks,

I’m trying to do some planning around an upcoming half ton truck purchase for towing a Kimberley Kamper, and I’m wondering about new half tons like the hybrid Tundra and the Ram 1500 w/the Hemi eTorque. As I understand it, they don’t have alternators. What does this mean in terms of adding a Redarc BCDC charger/isolator and an auxiliary battery? Would you still simply wire the BCDC to the crank battery, and likewise to the second battery like I have in my 200 Series?

I can’t find a single example online of someone adding an aux battery to either of these trucks, which makes me think there’s a fundamental issue that I don’t currently understand. :)

Thanks,
Gino
Just a question, do you need a hybrid? One of the downers with Toyota is that you can only get the I-Force Max engine in the limited trims and higher. Unlike Ford, you can get the Powerboost engine in every trim down to just the basic work truck. Not to sure about Ram and the availability of the eTorque Hemi's? My Buddy here at work has a 2020 Ram Rebel with the eTorque Hemi and he loves it. Ton's of power but he only sees about 14 to 15 MPG's in the city and about 17 to 18 on the highway.

Not to get off topic of the thread but I finally got my SR5 Crew Max allocated to me this last weekend, should be built on the 26th of October and Delivered at the end of November or early December. I contemplated the hybrid engine but based on costs, I didn't feel like my investment would be maximized. Especially if you are only seeing the MPG gains in town. I don't believe the I-Force Max has extended mileage gains on the highway compared to the normal gasser? If Toyota had the same set up as Ford with a high end invertor and 7.2kWh battery set up I would definitely go with a hybrid Toyota but again I don't feel that you will ever make up cost difference in gas savings?
 
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mulebarn

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Jun 24, 2020
Messages
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Location
Boulder County
Just a question, do you need a hybrid? One of the downers with Toyota is that you can only get the I-Force Max engine in the limited trims and higher. Unlike Ford, you can get the Powerboost engine in every trim down to just the basic work truck. Not to sure about Ram and the availability of the eTorque Hemi's? My Buddy here at work has a 2020 Ram Rebel with the eTorque Hemi and he loves it. Ton's of power but he only sees about 14 to 15 MPG's in the city and about 17 to 18 on the highway.

Not to get off topic of the thread but I finally got my SR5 Crew Max allocated to me this last weekend, should be built on the 26th of October and Delivered at the end of November or early December. I contemplated the hybrid engine but based on costs, I didn't feel like my investment would be maximized. Especially if you are only seeing the MPG gains in town. I don't believe the I-Force Max has extended mileage gains on the highway compared to the normal gasser? If Toyota had the same set up as Ford with a high end invertor and 7.2kWh battery set up I would definitely go with a hybrid Toyota but again I don't feel that you will ever make up cost difference in gas savings?
Don’t hijack my thread, bro. :) The mpg differences are negligible. The hybrid Toyota is about performance, not mpg, and that’s our priority for this vehicle. That, and we want the higher trim level features.
 

ScaldedDog

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Dec 18, 2005
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This month's Car and Driver (of which I might be the last paper subscriber), reviews the Tundra, F-150 and Ram hybrid offerings, for those who are interested. No discussion of dual alternators, though.

Mark
 
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